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Know your Miranda Rights when accused of a criminal charge

Trying to understand just why or how you or a loved one has found yourselves in the middle of a criminal predicament isn't always an easy task. There are those who are innocent, guilty and shades of both. Remember that there is a time and a place when a person should consider telling their side of the story. It may not be in a person's best interest to communicate with authorities or with anyone, for that matter, until it is in their best interest to do so.

One thing that those accused of a crime will be asked of is to answer questions. You have the right to remain silent under the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. It is perfectly acceptable to remain silent when accused of a crime; a person is under no obligation to answer investigator's questions if they do not wish to do so. This is because anything you say to an investigator can be used against you in a court of law.

There could be a real issue if a person accused of a crime was not read their Miranda Rights while being placed under arrest. A person must be made aware of their rights under the Constitution when being placed under arrest, as it notifies them of their rights in the situation. If you or a loved one was not read your rights, it could be a huge point of interest for building a person's criminal defense. Due process must be utilized in all arrests made by Sacramento authorities.

Most likely, a person placed under arrest was read their rights at that time. The key is to leverage the rights that one has when placed under arrest. While it isn't optimal, there is a way for the accused to tell their side of the story. That place may not be in an interrogation room, however, but, instead, may be in a court of law.

Source: FindLaw, "'Miranda Rights' and the First Amendment," Accessed September 4, 2017

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